Categories
ideas

Follow the Genuary prompts

The first edition of Genuary was launched in January 2021: the website genuary2021.github.io provided 31 prompts – 1 per day – to invite participants to “make beautiful things with code”.

GENUARY aims to make it possible for people to do 31 daily prompts, one every day, during that day.

On the Generative reddit board, Piterpisma writes:

it started in Inktober, when a couple of generative artists remarked they found it difficult to apply the prompts of Inktober to generative art. Then I thought I came up with the name “Genuary”

Productions were to be shared on twitter using the hashtag #genuary2021.

Some participants documented their creations on a website, such as data scientist Ram Narasimhan (who codes using the Python extension of Processing).

Genuary 2022

Another edition takes place in 2022, the website being genuary.art and the twitter hashtag #genuary2022. Some of the prompts:

  • Day 1: Draw 10,000 of something.
  • Day 5: Destroy a square.
  • Day 6: Trade styles with a friend.
  • Day 10: Machine learning, wrong answers only.
  • Day 11: No computer.
  • Day 16: Color gradients gone wrong.
  • Day 18: VHS.
  • Day 21: Combine two (or more) of your pieces from previous days to make a new piece.
  • Day 23: Abstract vegetation.
  • Day 24: Create your own pseudo-random number generator and visually check the results.

A github issue collects prompt suggestions for the 2023 edition.

See also: Plot Party

A similar five-day prompt was launched in November 2021 under the name “Plot Party” by the pen plotter community. The prompts were:

  • Nov 8 – Weather
  • Nov 9 – Multiple Line Widths
  • Nov 10 – Glitches (errors/bugs) – “Embrace mistakes, whether in code or during the pen plotting process”
  • Nov 11 – Postcard – “A postcard sized prompt, make any small, postcard sized work. There is also an optional postcard exchange”
  • Nov 12 – No Pen – “Forgo a pen for any other tool”

Results are gathered on the Pen Plotter Artwork Blog, and can be found via the #plotparty hashtag.

Categories
briefs ideas

Another year in web design

A few years ago, Taschen released a heavy volume of web design history – Web Design: The Evolution of the Digital World 1990-Today.

The survey in the book ends in 2018.

In this brief, students are asked to continue the story by adding a new chapter – how does the current year in web design look like? They will have to identify current design trends, major innovations, notable websites, and organize the information following the examples in the book.

Depending on the number of students, they can work on one year, or on several missing years (2019, 2020, 2021…).

Categories
briefs

music and photographs

This brief is inspired by this line, by photographer Joséphine Michel, on her collaboration with Mika Vainio:

Écouter tous les matins un de ses albums, puis aller photographier des lieux en correspondance avec sa musique. Dans la nature, ou dans les musées de sciences

Source: Fisheye Magazine

Categories
briefs ideas

Layer tennis

Engage students in a tournament of “layer tennis” (also known as Photoshop ping-pong”. According to Wikipedia:

The players pick a starting image, or one is “served” by a player, then another player makes some sort of alteration to the image in any chosen image editor (matches are not exclusive to Adobe Photoshop). They then send the altered image to the other player or players, usually via e-mail or by posting the image to a Photoshop tennis forum, who then edits that image and sends it back to the first player. This process goes back and forth until a predetermined number of rounds have elapsed, or the players otherwise wish to end the game.

Ressources:

Categories
historical

twenty variations of a small size newspaper ad

In the 2014/04 issue of TM-RSI, Helmut Schmid writes a recollection:

My first typographic exercice under Emil Ruder was twenty variations of a small size newspaper ad. Eight of them were shown in November 1961 in Graphisches abc, a german magazine for apprentices of the graphic trade.

Categories
briefs

campaign website from the past

Students have to design a website for a historical figure (maybe from a list provided by the instructor).

Example carried out in 2021 by student Messaline Piette at Eracom, Lausanne:

Categories
briefs

Instagram Stories

A brief proposed by Frederik Mahler-Andersen : students have to create an Instagram Story, as a series of short animations (combining video, image, text). The topic has to be a news article chosen by the student.

An example, carried out over five weeks with a graphic design class at Eracom: https://www.instagram.com/eracom_gr491/

Categories
briefs

Create a new emoji

Create a new emoji character. Go through a brainstorming process to come up with useful new emoji types. Design them, in the style of different emoji / OS alphabets (Google, Twitter, OpenMoji…).

Study the emoji submission process:

https://unicode.org/emoji/proposals.html

Get inspired by actual emoji proposals : https://www.unicode.org/emoji/charts/emoji-proposals.html

Get inspired by the OpenMoji styleguide:

https://openmoji.org/styleguide/

Related reading:

Ellen Lupton, Design is Storytelling, p. 100.
Jennifer Daniel (March 23 2020), Talk to Me: The Evolution of Emoji, Google Design

Categories
briefs

a new face for the apple watch

An assignment by David Reinfurt, from his Advanced Graphic Design at Princeton University. Reinfurt describes this assignment in the liner notes for an exhibition of student work, held at Hurley Gallery, Lewis Arts complex, in 2017:

The assignment is simple and lasts the full semester — design a new face for the apple watch which tells the time, and (by design) also changes the way you *read* the time. Simple, no? The students begin by considering, with a broad historical scope, how the representation of time affects the ways we understand it and use it.

Categories
briefs

100 day project

An assignment by Michael Bierut, that he described in 2011 on the Design Observer blog:

For the past five years, I’ve taught a workshop for the graduate graphic design students at the Yale School of Art. The specific dates always change, but the basic assignment goes something like this:

Beginning Thursday, October 21, 2010, do a design operation that you are capable of repeating every day. Do it every day between today and up to and including Friday, January 28, 2011, the last day of the project, by which time you will have done the operation one hundred times. That afternoon, each student will have up to 15 minutes to present his or her one-hundred part project to the class.

The only restrictions on the operation you choose is that it must be repeated in some form every day, and that every iteration must be documented for eventual presentation. The medium is open, as is the final form of the presentation on the 100th day.

In the article, Bierut shares some of the most amazing outcomes.

Other examples

Guillaume Berry publishes on the blog of swiss design agency Antistatique his “100 Days of Lettering” challenge. Other designers taking part are Francis Chouquet and Chris Campe.